Monthly Archives: November 2015

Pay Per Click Advertising

Pay Per Click advertising has many pseudonyms, PPC, search engine advertising, SEA, paid search advertising – but they all refer to the same thing. PPC is a type of online marketing available on the popular search engines like Bing, Yahoo and Google where the advertiser only pays if their ad is clicked and a visitor arrives at their website.

The PPC ads appear alongside and above the organic search results on the search engine results pages. Major Pay Per Click advertising platforms are based on a bidding per keyword model. The advertiser simply decides which keyword phrases they would like to trigger their ads and chooses a maximum price they would be willing to pay if a visitor clicked their ad once triggered by the selected keyword.

Many different advertisers are often bidding on the same keyword and hence the bidding model is used to determine the position where the advertiser’s ad will display. Google, the largest PPC advertising channel (Google AdWords) displays a maximum of 11 ads per page. The most commonly seen arrangement of ads is three ads above the organic search results with a further 8 ads down the right hand side with position 1 being at the very top and position 11 being at the bottom of the right hand side.

The cost per click is determined by many different factors:

  • Number of competitors bidding for that word
  • Position of the ads in the search result (from 1 to 11)
  • The quality of the ad and relevance to the keyword
  • The quality of the website that users will finally end up on
  • The relevance of the website that users will end up on to the keyword and the ad
  • The click through rate of the ad (how many people click the ad compared to how many times the ad is displayed)

In most cases the top position in the paid results is the most expensive; however other factors as listed above can mean that the highest bidder will not necessarily take the top position.

Pay Per Click advertising is available to anybody with a website or a landing page and is a highly targeted digital marketing channel. PPC advertising allows you to target users who are actively searching for keywords associated with your product, service of business and then only makes you pay if someone actually visits your website.

PPC advertising also allows for detailed reporting and analytics so you can tell exactly how many people clicked your ads, what it costs and how much revenue you made. This makes it super easy to calculate your return on investment (ROI). You can set your daily or monthly budgets so that you know exactly what you are going to spend on a day-to-day basis. Which makes keeping track of your advertising costs simple.

Benefits Of Business Blogging – Part Four

4) It drives long-term results.

You know what would be cool? If any of the following things helped you drive site traffic and generate new leads:

  • Trip to Hawaii
  • Going to the gym
  • Sleeping

Good news, though! That’s what blogging does — largely through search engines. Here’s what I mean:

Let’s say you sit down for an hour and write and publish a blog post today. Let’s say that blog post gets you 100 views and 10 leads. You get another 50 views and 5 leads tomorrow as a few more people find it on social media and some of your subscribers get caught up on their email and RSS. But after a couple days, most of the fanfare from that post dies down and you’ve netted 150 views and 15 leads.

It’s not done.

That blog post is now ranking in search engines. That means for days, weeks, months, and years to come, you can continue to get traffic and leads from that blog post.

So while you’re hitting your snooze alarm, surfing in Hawaii, and pumping iron, you’re also driving traffic and leads. The effort you put in yesterday can turn into hundreds of thousands of views and leads in the future.

In fact, about 70% of the traffic each month on this very blog comes from posts that weren’t published in the current month. They come from old posts. Same goes for the leads generated in a current month — about 90% of the leads we generate every month come from blog posts that were published in previous months. Sometimes years ago.

We call these types of blog posts “compounding” posts. Not every blog post will fit into this category, but the more evergreen blog posts you write, the more likely it is that you’ll land on one of those compounding blog posts. In our own research, we’ve found that about 1 in every 10 blog posts end up being compounding blog posts.

To me (and hopefully to you), this demonstrates the scalability of business blogging. While you might not see immediate results, over time, you’ll be able to count on a predictable amount of traffic and leads for your business without any additional resource investment — the work to generate that traffic and those leads is already done.

If you’d like to learn more about the long-term impact of blogging and how to reap even more benefits from the blog posts that are ranking in organic search for your business, check out this blog post, “The Blogging Tactic No One Is Talking About: Optimizing the Past”.

 

Benefits Of Business Blogging – Part Three

3) It helps establish authority.

The best business blogs answer common questions their leads and customers have. If you’re consistently creating content that’s helpful for your target customer, it’ll help establish you as an authority in their eyes. This is a particularly handy tool for Sales and Service professionals.

Can you imagine the impact of sending an educational blog post you wrote to clear things up for a confused customer? Or how many more deals a salesperson could close if their leads discovered blog content written by their salesperson?

“Establishing authority” is a fluffy metric – certainly not as concrete as traffic and leads, but it’s pretty powerful stuff. And if you need to tie the impact of blogging to a less fluffy metric, consider measuring it the same way you measure sales enablement. Because at the end of the day, that’s what many of your blog posts are. Think about the sales enablement opportunities blogging presents:

  • If prospects find answers to their common questions via blog posts written by people at your company, they’re much more likely to come into the sales process trusting what you have to say because you’ve helped them in the past — even before they were interested in purchasing anything from you.
  • Prospects that have been reading your blog posts will typically enter the sales process more educated on your place in the market, your industry, and what you have to offer. That makes for a far more productive sales conversation than one held between two relative strangers.
  • Salespeople who encounter specific questions that require in-depth explanation or a documented answer can pull from an archive of blog posts. Not only do these blog posts help move the sales process along more swiftly than if a sales rep had to create the assets from scratch, but the salesperson is further positioned as a helpful resource to their prospect.